Project Description

Screen x Sound Artworks: For Juliet
Cover image: Eman Ezekiel

FOR JULIET / TASH ATKINS

FOR JULIET uses text from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to create a queer retelling of the classic love story. The composition combines Algorave (music created using code) and classical singing techniques to create an atmospheric love song. This is a new experimental composition practice for Tash, celebrating their training as a classical singer and combining it with electronic music-making techniques. This work was originally devised to use the rhythms of the industrial space around the Signal building next to Flinders Street Station; the noise of the train line, quickening footsteps in rush hour, the construction of the city. Musical storytelling is used to create an experimental soundscape for exploring how rhythm and modernity can impact how we perceive music. By creating music for urban public spaces, we break down the barriers to accessing art. Furthermore, it dismantles the classist barriers to art. This piece tells a modern love story, now in a public digital space, and creates a musical conversation between historical classical music, code and the rhythms of your listening environment. FOR JULIET challenges the listener to examine what they think of classical music and create a point of entry for new interest and accessibility within the medium.

FOR JULIET / TASH ATKINS

FOR JULIET uses text from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to create a queer retelling of the classic love story. The composition combines Algorave (music created using code) and classical singing techniques to create an atmospheric love song. This is a new experimental composition practice for Tash, celebrating their training as a classical singer and combining it with electronic music-making techniques. This work was originally devised to use the rhythms of the industrial space around the Signal building next to Flinders Street Station; the noise of the train line, quickening footsteps in rush hour, the construction of the city. Musical storytelling is used to create an experimental soundscape for exploring how rhythm and modernity can impact how we perceive music. By creating music for urban public spaces, we break down the barriers to accessing art. Furthermore, it dismantles the classist barriers to art. This piece tells a modern love story, now in a public digital space, and creates a musical conversation between historical classical music, code and the rhythms of your listening environment. FOR JULIET challenges the listener to examine what they think of classical music and create a point of entry for new interest and accessibility within the medium.

Screen x Sound Artworks: For Juliet
Cover image: Eman Ezekiel

FOR JULIET

TASH ATKINS

FOR JULIET uses text from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to create a queer retelling of the classic love story. The composition combines Algorave (music created using code) and classical singing techniques to create an atmospheric love song. This is a new experimental composition practice for Tash, celebrating their training as a classical singer and combining it with electronic music-making techniques. This work was originally devised to use the rhythms of the industrial space around the Signal building next to Flinders Street Station; the noise of the train line, quickening footsteps in rush hour, the construction of the city. Musical storytelling is used to create an experimental soundscape for exploring how rhythm and modernity can impact how we perceive music. By creating music for urban public spaces, we break down the barriers to accessing art. Furthermore, it dismantles the classist barriers to art. This piece tells a modern love story, now in a public digital space, and creates a musical conversation between historical classical music, code and the rhythms of your listening environment. FOR JULIET challenges the listener to examine what they think of classical music and create a point of entry for new interest and accessibility within the medium.

Screen x Sound Artworks: For Juliet
Cover image: Eman Ezekiel